Untitled

where cobwebs lay
aprettyfire:

If you’re a student like me, I’m guess you’re either in the midst of finals or have some coming up soon! We all need some good studying music, so here’s a list of Studio Ghibli playlists filled with the best Ghibli has to offer! I hope this helps you stay focused, and happy studying!
Studio Ghibli mix by sakana-ya (8tracks)
Studio Ghibli mix by isoldestewart (8tracks)
Joe Hisaishi mix by neverafall (8tracks)
Eyes Unclouded by Hate by inkyfingers (8tracks)
Wake Up with Studio Ghibli by bippityboppitywho (8tracks)
Studio Ghibli Collection (youtube) (collection of ghibli playlists, mostly piano)
Joe Hisaishi in Budokan - Studio Ghibli 25 Years Concert (youtube)
Studio Ghibli Music Box Songs (youtube)
The Studio Ghibli Collection (spotify)
Somewhere by matchacakes (8tracks)

aprettyfire:

If you’re a student like me, I’m guess you’re either in the midst of finals or have some coming up soon! We all need some good studying music, so here’s a list of Studio Ghibli playlists filled with the best Ghibli has to offer! I hope this helps you stay focused, and happy studying!

(via prettybabo)

Before You Tell Me I'm Lying

trevsplace:

YOSHITAKA AMANOTHE SANDMAN: THE DREAM HUNTERS1999Watercolor on paper
Award-winning painter Amano never sells his original artwork; this was a gift to his collaborator on Dream Hunters.From the collection of Neil GaimanAs promised, here are a couple more photos (aggregated) from the Cartoon Art Museum's Sandman exhibit (held earlier this year). Viewing original artwork imparts a gamut of emotions - admiration, awe, wonder, joy, and countless others. When I first laid eyes on Amano's Dream Hunters painting, my initial response was definitely one of awe. Wonder, admiration, and joy were quick to follow, but awe arrived first. Amano’s Dream Hunters caught me off-guard, or more accurately the sheer scope of the piece did. I included a second image (below) in order to convey a sense of scale. Bear in mind, original comic book cover art is typically much larger than the product it’s eventually printed to, and that generalization holds true for the adjacent Sandman Overture cover art. I knew going into the exhibit that I’d have the pleasure of bearing witness to a Yoshitaka Amano original, but despite that foreknowledge, I was ill-prepared for the majestic presence of the piece. If you ever have an opportunity to experience Yoshitaka Amano’s artwork firsthand, do so. 
More Sandman exhibit photos are forthcoming, as well as a few photos from the museum’s other galleries. Even the museum’s gift shop, which employs rather novel signage, is fair game. Links to my previous Cartoon Art Museum Sandman exhibit photographs are listed below:
Sandman Overture no. 1: a side-by-side comparison of the original J.H. Williams III painting to that of the digitally augmented one that graced the cover of the published comic
Sandman vol. 1, issue 8, page no. 13: "The Sound of Her Wings"
Death: by Sam Kieth
Sandman 70: Which Occurs in The Wake of What Has Gone Before
The Endless: Still Life With Cats
Sandman vol. 1, issue 1, page no. 1: Sleep of the Just

trevsplace:

YOSHITAKA AMANO
THE SANDMAN: THE DREAM HUNTERS
1999
Watercolor on paper

Award-winning painter Amano never sells his original artwork; this was a gift to his collaborator on Dream Hunters.

From the collection of Neil Gaiman

As promised, here are a couple more photos (aggregated) from the Cartoon Art Museum's Sandman exhibit (held earlier this year). Viewing original artwork imparts a gamut of emotions - admiration, awe, wonder, joy, and countless others. When I first laid eyes on Amano's Dream Hunters painting, my initial response was definitely one of awe. Wonder, admiration, and joy were quick to follow, but awe arrived first. Amano’s Dream Hunters caught me off-guard, or more accurately the sheer scope of the piece did. I included a second image (below) in order to convey a sense of scale. Bear in mind, original comic book cover art is typically much larger than the product it’s eventually printed to, and that generalization holds true for the adjacent Sandman Overture cover art. I knew going into the exhibit that I’d have the pleasure of bearing witness to a Yoshitaka Amano original, but despite that foreknowledge, I was ill-prepared for the majestic presence of the piece. If you ever have an opportunity to experience Yoshitaka Amano’s artwork firsthand, do so. 

More Sandman exhibit photos are forthcoming, as well as a few photos from the museum’s other galleries. Even the museum’s gift shop, which employs rather novel signage, is fair game.

Links to my previous Cartoon Art Museum Sandman exhibit photographs are listed below:

(via neil-gaiman)

rhamphotheca:

Snake Poop and The Adaptive Ballast Hypothesis

by Andrew Durso

Most people probably spend as little time as possible thinking about poop, especially snake poop. Some animals produce enormous amounts of poop, like dairy cows. Others make lots of little poops - up to 50 a day in small birds.  

In contrast, snakes don’t poop much at all. In fact, because they eat so infrequently, snakes probably poop the least often of almost any animal. Anyone who has kept a snake as a pet can tell you that a few days after they’re fed, most snakes tend to poop once (often in their water bowls, for some annoying reason), and they might poop again within a few more days.

Like bird poop, snake poop is made up of two parts - the brown stuff (the fecal fragment, aka the actual poop) and the white stuff (the uric acid fragment, aka the pee, in a solid form). Also like birds, most reptiles use uric acid rather than urea to excrete their excess nitrogen, which helps them conserve water.

You wouldn’t think there would be much that’s interesting about snake poop, but to a snake biologist everything about snakes is interesting. In 2002, Harvey Lillywhite, Pierre de Delva, and Brice Noonan published a chapter in the book Biology of the Vipers that detailed their studies on snake poop.

Their most amazing finding was that some snakes can go for a really, really long time without pooping. As in, over a year. It’s not because they’re constipated though - these long fecal retention periods have actually evolved for a purpose in snakes.

Here’s what happens: most snakes eat very large meals, and they eat them all in one piece. That means that when a snake eats a meal, its body mass can more than double all at once, and it can only digest that meal from the outside in, because it hasn’t chewed or cut it up into small pieces to increase its surface area. Even for the insane digestive tract of a snake, this is an incredible feat…

(read more: Life is Short, Snakes Are Long)

photos: A. Durso, Pedro Rodriguez, and Cater News Agency

Bastille, Gabrielle Aplin – Dreams (122,555 plays)

showslow:

Dreams (Fleetwood Mac Cover) by Bastille & Gabrielle Aplin

Like a heartbeat drives you mad
In the stillness of remembering what you had
And what you lost

(Source: dantada)